Exposed: The worldwide hypocritical stance by successive UK ministers on women’s rights and their pensions

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The logo of the convention on the elimination of discrimination against women

EXCLUSIVE TO THIS BLOG AND BYLINE.COM

A damning academic expert opinion on successive UK government’s failure to meet its international obligations to  1950s women hit by the rise in the pension age is to be presented in court soon as part of an application for a judicial review of the decision

Jackie Jones, a law professor at the University of the West England , has produced the report,  which shows that this group of women have suffered discrimination contrary to an international  convention signed by successive UK governments. It is not a legal document but it is an expert opinion.

The full brief  can be clicked on  here. AMICUS BRIEF 10 September 2018

The reports conclusion’s are stark :

 “The effect of the mechanisms in issue in this case have a discriminatory effect on women born in the 50s, adversely impacting on older women’s health, economic and social life in that the voluntary use of the mechanisms have the effect of failing to provide adequate access to pensions for women and therefore must be removed and full restitution substituted. “

Margaret Thatcher’s government in 1986 took the decision to sign up to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (known as CEDAW)  – an international treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly and now recognised by 189 countries. In 2004 Tony Blair’s government went a step further and accepted an optional protocol and  UK ministers of all parties have played an active role in its international work for many years.

The UK’s treaty obligations mean that we are signed up, as the report says, to “women’s equality within society, in both the public and private spheres, obligating States to formulate policies, laws and programmes to advance women and promote substantive equality (equality in outcome, not only equality of opportunity) as well as from refraining from actions that will put women in a worse position.

“It includes alleviating economic disadvantage as a result of persistent structural inequality and remedying past injustices that had and continue to put women in a disadvantageous position vis-à-vis men. ”

The report argues that the UK is in breach of its international treaty obligations in three main areas over the treatment of 50s women.

The rise in the pension age from 60 to 65 and then 66 for women was far more drastic than for men who  faced a one year rise in 2020 compared to a six year rise for women. The implementation of the taper which meant women had to wait longer and longer for their pension  and it was made worse by the failure of the government to inform individuals how the decision would affect them. And finally the decision targeted one particular group – those born in the 1950s in a much more drastic way than anybody else – and successive governments have failed to even consider reviewing its effects.

The report says : “The imposition of the mechanisms resulted in women born in the 50s’ access to pensions being postponed, in some cases for years, despite the fact that women born in the 50s had a life-long expectation and had been repeatedly told that they would be entitled to their State pension at 60.

“The effect of the State measures of delay in being able to access State-sponsored pensions has meant a decrease in income for women born in the 50s as well as obligating women born in the 50s to continue to work or to find employment in order to make up any shortfall in pensions. This has led to substantial financial insecurity for the women so affected.

By their actions, the State has discriminated against these women because they are women as the measures only seriously adversely affect women born in the 50s, made the economic and health position of women born in the 50s significantly worse and thereby have infringed their human rights and fundamental freedoms as proscribed by CEDAW. “

In my view the ministers involved are hypocrites. Margaret Thatcher,as Britain’s first women prime minister, deserves praise  for signing the country up to the new convention.

But then her social security secretary, John Moore, within two years started undermining the position of  women  – first by withdrawing Treasury money to the  National Insurance Fund – leading eventually to  a shortfall  of  £271 billion – this included not only pensions but the funding of maternity allowances.

Then John Major’s government took the decision to raise the pension age rather than start paying money again into the fund which would have more than covered the current £77 billion to restore pensions for the 50s women. Successive governments  including Theresa May’s either did nothing or made matters worse by raising the pension age further claiming there was no money.

Meanwhile on the international stage Britain was portraying itself as a world leader in women’s rights with ministers attending the international convention meetings.

Since 1997 when Tony Blair created the position of minister for women in the Cabinet – the following prominent women politicians have held this job. which they combine with other duties. The Labour politicians are Harriet Harman, Baroness Jay,  Patricia Hewitt,the late Tessa Jowell and  Ruth Kelly.

The Tories are Theresa May, Maria Miller, Nicky Morgan, Justine Greening,Amber Rudd and Penny Mordaunt , the current minister who is also international development secretary.

These women should be backing the case for 50s women if they have a shred  of integrity and want to live up to the ideals of a convention signed by Margaret Thatcher which commits the country to the advancement of women.

CEDAR is already planning to hold the UK to account in February for breaching its commitment to women over austerity – 86 per cent of benefits cuts fall on women.

With the judicial review of the raising of the pension age and this international pressure over the UK’s discrimination against women over benefit cuts the scene is set for a perfect storm for the UK government.

 

88 thoughts on “Exposed: The worldwide hypocritical stance by successive UK ministers on women’s rights and their pensions

  1. Pingback: Exposed: The worldwide hypocritical stance by successive UK ministers on women’s rights and their pensions — David Hencke | O LADO ESCURO DA LUA

  2. Hope things are moving on with this big issue for women born in the 50s this was so unexpected, and no time for women to plan for there future this was so unfair, and family life as changed so much now, looking after parents and grandchildren, we paid into the system and it was taken of us, let’s get this entitlements back to all us 50s women.

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  3. These women should be backing the case for 50s women if they have a shred of integrity…says it all really…i doubt they could spell integrity let alone practice it….i think this moving of the goalposts for women will continue and the next move will be to deny payment until 70 years of age……if they can get away with this i’m sure they will proceed with raising it again

    it is utterly disgraceful and i will never vote tory again, and neither will any of my family…

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  4. David Hencke thank you. Without your clarity on the issue it would be very difficult to see the historic truth and current developments. I am a 50s woman affected, retired early, partly due to health reasons and supported/cared for my mother and grandchildren. Luckily, I am supported by a husband but I know many are not. Nevertheless, I always planned for retirement at 60.Successive governments have been involved in gross injustice and I believe discrimination against 50s women.

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  5. This is affirmation of EVERY but of suffering we have had and still having. Fundamentally wrong – it won’t be right until it is put right by judicial review if necessary. Namibg ALL the women ‘Ministers for women’ only highlight those who step on, not uplift, their sisters. They should all be ashamed. I would add Altmann to the listt – as a pensions speciist, she was in the exact spot to help and did nothing except enjoy her baronetcy. These women have been as bad as male politicians 1993-2011 and are no role models.

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  6. 👋 On behalf of we 1950’s born women, may I offer our Total Thanks (TT) for another excellent, well-researched, informative article @DavidHencke 👏 TT to CEDAR too! 👍 Successive govt’s have an awful lot to answer for & must correct these inhumane injustices!

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  7. If I had been notified of the changes I would have certainly have changed my job as I have a very manual one and have been employed with the same company for nearly 30 years so when I found out when I was 58 couldn’t go be a new girl in an office or other. We also had sold our house earlier to save for when I retired at 60 to be able to top up pension and do the things together what we had planned.

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  8. My retirement plans have been thoroughly kicked into the bin. I planned I saved, I worked while looking after young/sick/elderly family members. I knew exactly what I would be doing and where when I reached my 60th birthday. I could have coped with the first spa rise but the second finished my dreams. I’ve had 3 pension retirement dates. To hit the same group of women more than once, with little or no warning, is a disgrace. My savings are gone, I’ll be too old and poor when I reach 66 to live my retirement dream. I’m left claiming JSA and jumping through the DWP hoops of job search, courses, retraining, constant threats of sanctions, failed work capability tests – all to receive the pittance of £73.10 a week.

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  9. Thank you so much David for all of your support. You have brought to the fore the plight of 50s born women. We all know about the serious hardship it has brought to so many women which the government have chosen to completely ignore. All previous governments are guilty of this robbery of our pensions but particularly Teresa May and her government..by lying that no woman would be more than 18 months worse off. I and many women stand to lose up to £50,000 pension over 6 years. How can any working class person find that kind of money in such a short time ?

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  10. Thank you for highlighting the perpetual and disgraceful discrimination fifties women continue to be subjected to. As a fifties woman myself I find it disgraceful that it is women in positions of power who refuse to address this discrimination in particular the Prime Minister. How dare they celebrate the suffragettes whilst keeping their heels on our heads!

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  11. This group of women have suffered discrimination throughout their working lives and have been further insulted by governments viewing them as an easy target. This has to stop

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  12. This is a really good read and please let it help us get what we have earned

    I gave up my work at 58 and adopted a child as I genuinely thought I would get my pension at 60 then – Wham I found out I wouldn’t get it till I was 66

    If I or anyone else had paid into some scheme for years on the premise that we would draw it at 60 and then the company reneged on paying for 6 years they would have been hauled before the select committee

    It is alleged that one individual actually committed suicide after he was going to have to explain where his employees pension pot had gone

    I know that’s extreme but that’s how I feel we have had ours plundered

    I was a civil servant and I do get my civil service pension along with a lot of others who never actually contributed to it until around 10 years ago

    Good luck

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  13. Thank you David for your constant support to women born in the 1950s and for publishing these reports exposing UK Governments for their disgusting, unjust and discriminatory attitudes towards women. The fact there are women MPs, Prime Ministers and women of power and influence who are complicit in this treatment by not standing up for this group of women shows their selfishness, their arrogance and a complete and utter lack of empathy. How do they live with themselves?

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  14. I am coming up to my 64 birthday i am having to retire as i no longer can cope with working . My life would have been so different if i could have retired at 60. I understand there may be less money in the pot but to change my retirement date from 60 to 66 is disgraceful. I will live on my savings now. I have worked from 13(saturday/holiday jobs) then fulltime till i was 60 then part time till now. I am worn out!!

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  15. Thank you David… This government will have stolen over 48K from me they knew about these changes many years ago and yet thought it would be so unpopular that they decided not to tell us while at the same time decided to stop paying into the fund. We have never had equality and still don’t have equality today its about time that TM grew a backbone and admitted that they got it wrong good style, no matter how many consecutive governments ignored this issue she now has an opportunity to do the right thing, we are not going away.

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  16. Well done David,, an excellent piece. Common sense dictates that we have right on our side, but I fear that it will be the cst of the backpay due to us that will sway the argument. I am totally behind th3 fight for justice though. Keep up the good work.

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  17. I was born in 1956. Out working at 15. I am now 62 and not in the best of health. I was always under the impression that at 60 I would receive my well earned state pension. It’s disgusting what has happened to the 1950 ladies and it should be put right. We signed a contract to pay full stamp to receive a full pension at 60 . The government should honour this. They can find money for everyone else so find ourselves. We paid in your should pay out. It’s OUR OWN MONEY. NOT YOURS!!!

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    • Can I ask what contract you signed? I was born 54 and always paid full stamp but I was never given, or asked to sign, a contract. I wonder if it was something your employer asked you to sign ????

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      • Trish Alderson, the contract that WE all signed was the NI1 form. I remember this day well the office manager came and asked me if I wanted to pay the married womens stamp or the full stamp. I didn’t understand so I asked my mum she said pay the FULL STAMP you will get your Old Age Pension that’s what people called it. So if ladies are saying that we signed a contract that is what we signed. And Judith I think that you know this. So why ask what contract IF you say it wasn’t a contract I think that there are Millions who really believe they did sign a contact. I am quite disappointed with your post.

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      • Trish I may have signed to say I agreed to pay full stamp but that had nothing to do with SP age. I was agreeing to pay full NICs in return for a pension in my own right at my SP age whenever that should be.
        If anyone has proof of this contract that says ….”pay full stamp and we guarantee you will get a pension at 60 regardless of any future changes to legislation” then I’d love to see it.

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  18. I was born in 1956. Out working at 15. I am now 62 and not in the best of health. I was always under the impression that at 60 I would receive my well earned state pension. It’s disgusting what has happened to the 1950 ladies and it should be put right. We signed a contract to pay full stamp to receive a full pension at 60 . The government should honour this. They can find money for everyone else so find ourselves. We paid in your should pay out. It’s OUR OWN MONEY. NOT YOURS!!! A bit thank you to you David.

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  19. Thank you so much i really hope the outcome is the right one for all the women affected, this was a very interesting read and i hope all those women who are listed recieve a copy and make a stand for the many who are suffering ,plan for the future is what we are now being told we did but it was taken away, i even had a work pension but guess what i worked in cartering for NHS and that was privatised so it was frozen up grrrrr hit again plus i had no choice but to pay serpps, which was never explained ,so many wrongs lets hope we now get the RIGHT we all deserve Big Big Thank You for this

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  20. I have worked all my life ( part time from the age of 13 in fact, and full time from 19) except for a short break of three years for maternity and childrearing. I was prudent, paid a full stamp and when promotions came along I took out AVCs to supplement my retirement fund. I had intended to work to 60 but in my early 50s both of my parents died. They werent old in today’s terms and it made me revise my plans. Councils were paring back on staff and my job was declared redundant. I decided to access my pension as the redundancy lump sum would last me , if I was careful with my reduced monthly income, until my state pension was due at 60. Then, worryingly, this suddenly became 62 and then an alarming 66. Nobody wants to employ me at 63 as I now have health issues. I can’t claim jobseekers’ allowance as my pension puts me over the threshold and my savings are almost gone. I thought I had saved for an old age where I would be financially secure. Instead I am forced to penny pinch and my husband ( now 65) has deferred his retirement until my state pension supplements our household income. He is older than me and I feel this is totally unfair but in reality I understand his decision. We deserve to be treated better than this. We are not work shy, and we don’t want anything other than what we were promised. I am helping to fund the Back to 60 campaign. Hope the legal challenge is succesful.

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    • Your information is incorrect. The 2011 Act added a maximum of 18 months to your SP age so if it’s 66 now then it was never 62. Depending on your dob your SP age after the 95 Act would have been between 64.5 and 65.

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      • Judith Bywater, that is just not true. I was born in 1957 and expected to get my state pension at 60, it didn’t just change by a year or two, it really did suddenly become 66, with no warning. And then came the double whammy – in 2015 I was told I needed 30 qualifying years for the full state pension, I had 31. I only found out recently, by chance, that this was changed in 2016 to 35 years. No notification whatsoever. Had I known, I’d have paid class 2 NICs during the 4 years I ran an online business, but at the time I didn’t think it necessary as I’d already done my 30 years! Now it will cost me a lot more, £3000 to make it up. Not sure I’ll live long enough to justify that expense!

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  21. Thank you so much for your efforts to reverse this discrimination and inequality for women born in the 50s.
    I’ve worked since I was 16 then trained to be a nurse. I had no maternity breaks and sleayscworkedninvthe Nhs and still do atva senior level.
    The government took my Nhs pension for 10 yrs when they did not recognise me as working in Nhs when I worked in general practices. 20 yrs lost £48,000. Superannuation given back without my knowledge when I left to have a baby again 15 yrs Nhs pension lost and still working. Get to 60 and find I’ve got to work till 65 7 m without notice. £42,000 plus list.
    I’m exhausted unwell but plod on. WASPI supporter 1954. I give up discriminated against all my life but would never have worked doing anything else.
    Friends are still nursing at 72 as can’t afford to retire.
    Please continue with your support. Thank you

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  22. Your report is direct and to the point. All of us 50s women deserve the pension we have paid into for over 40 years. Good luck with the court case. Over a million women will be waiting with baited breath for the decision of a pension they deserve now, and backdated.

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  23. I’m now 64, 65 in January and due to receive pension in May 2019.
    I was dismissed from work at 59 because I had been off work for nearly a year with a severe back problem, depression and a newly diagnosed diabetic which wasn’t under control.
    Eventually the back pain eased and I could walk a little but by then my elderly mother needed looking after closely followed by my mother-in-law.
    Since being forced to leave my job I have received no government benefits and now my husband who eventually retired at 68 last Christmas needs full time care.
    My pension of which I have been robbed of would have been a help.
    I am so very grateful for all you are trying to do for all of us ladies. Thank you.

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  24. Thank you David for continuing to support women born in the 50s. Many women are really struggling – mentally and physically. We need a review of the effects at least.

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  25. Thankyou David for supporting all us 50’s women, robbed of our state pension entitlements, I am 62years old and still working 8am to 5pm five days a week, I want some quality me time before I get too old to enjoy what time I have left, I thank God I still have my health allowing me to work 45 hours a week!

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  26. “the measures only seriously adversely affect women born in the 50s”

    This is a truly bizarre statement. All women born after 1950, and all men born after 1953 have had their state pension age increased.

    Women born after 1961 have had 3 increases to their state pension age (as opposed to 2 for the majority of 1950s women), and have a state pension age of 67 (as opposed to a maximum of 66 for 1950s women). Women (and men) born after 1978 have state pension age of 68.

    I have a lot of sympathy for those affected by the sharp increase in state pension age, but claims that this is all about 1950s women only are divisive. It does little to help matters, or to build cross-cohort support for any positive, meaningful action.

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  27. Thank you so much for helping us 50s women. I should have retired at 60 but have to go until I am 66. I became a widow 11 years ago as my husband died aged 49 from Cancer but do not receive my Widows Pension until I am 66. I also got Cancer in 2010 and again in 2015 not sure if I will even reach the age of 66 but thank you for everything you are doing.

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  28. I feel very let down by these previous governments and quite frankly lied to by successive governments when they have blamed us and previous elderly people for living too long and drawing their state pension. This may in part be a factor, but it still is also a fact that although unemployment was over 3 million the respective governments did not increase funds but decide to with hold any fund that may have given us a chance of a pension.

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  29. Thank you David for your continued support and time you dedicate to this gross injustice. I have a friend who is 4 years older than me and by the time I pick up my first SPA, my friend will have been getting hers for 10 years! A loss of £38,000+!!! Please don’t give up on us 50’s women but continue your tremendous support – thank you.

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  30. I am doubtful that the court case will succeed as it will only consider the law rather than what is right or fair. The government is only concerned with economics and evidently regards 1950s born women as fair game, as have most people throughout our lives. They are all in shock at the actions being taken as it was assumed we would just lie back and take it. They are wrong.
    Before the changes were implemented, government assumed we would all stay on at work, pay more tax and earn more occupational pension. What they have utterly failed to acknowledge is that if you don’t actually tell people that you are making fundamental changes to their pension entitlement, they will complain in their thousands and force an expensive administration burden. It is staggering that no-one in government thought that this would happen and illustrates an elementary underestimation of our capabilities.
    If the court case is successful, I will be extremely pleased, but if it isn’t, we must never give up the fight to win back what has always belonged to us.

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  31. Boooom!!!! Very clear in It’s condemnation. Thank goodness someone is finally seeing the truth! Not sure what CEDAW can do but adds another bow to our arrow in challenging the govt through judiciary I would think?
    I am one of those 1950’s babies. I m 63, worked since 15yrs. Cared for husband, home, children ( we had no nurseries in those days).. Cared for parents, In laws etc. Cared for grandchildren so my daughter and husband could work and pay their taxes. All the time working myself. Last year I lost my job – disability related, I have a chronic illness. Company wouldn’t put up with me not going at speed train pace. A tribunal is in offing. I still have a mortgage. I have little income. I am diagnosed depressed and suffering anxiety. How could this happen? Why have myself and 72,000 other women been robbed by the respective govts then left to rot? Something must be done to put this right, this country is no longer a fair one, if it ever was.

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  32. This is a marvellous piece and says what has happened simply thank you, David. I am a 50’s woman myself and almost 64, I have been on ESA for over 2 years due to health issues. Like many others here I looked after my parents for many years and helped care for my granddaughters as my daughter was a single mother for many years, l have my granddaughters living with me now, I need my pension I have used up almost all my savings over the time I have been unable to work. I have 3 small pensions I can access at 65 but have to wait for my SP until 18 days before my 66th birthday I am seriously concerned as to how we will manage once my savings are gone. I deserve my pension, I had a paper round at 14, I worked part-time as a teenager on Saturdays and evenings some days after school, I started working full time at 17. After my children were born I went to work in the hours they were at school, and when they were old enough to be left to their own devices safely I went back to work full time until I became ill. I was made redundant at 60 but was fortunate to get another job using my experience of over 20 years supporting people to live independently but the hours were long and I think life caught up with me meaning I couldn’t continue working and lost my job due to my illness. I feel that I have done more than enough to have earned my right to my pension and hope that the legal route will be fruitful and we will receive what is our due.

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  33. Such an injustice. No time to plan, no notice or official letter explaining anything. Six more years I will have to work now. 46 years of national nsurance contributions I have made now set to lose nearly £50,000 of my pension contribution. Hard to find the words. Thank you to all those fighting this cause.

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  34. Dear David Hencke, the word ‘postponed’ is legally incorrect, as it gives the impression that the 1950s ladies with pension age risen half a decade, will get that 5 to 6 years money when they finally retire, instead of losing that money permanently for life. The discrimination is also under the flat rate new state pension, when most women as against half of men will not get the full money by its small print within 2014 pension act (law came into force 6 April 2016). Far more women were opted out of SERPs, most of the 80 per cent of all workers
    not needing any consent, than men. Men had the best wages, so had the best SERPs (additional top up pension) as it was earnings related, of the 20 per cent of workers left on SERPs. In 2004 the private pension industry wrote to all their customers telling them to opt back into SERPs, as in no way would the basic waged get as much into their works pension as they would have been paid by SERPs (aka from 2002 State Second Pension). The true equality would have been pension age 60 in 1995 for men and that discrimination also exists.

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  35. I was born in September 1954. I am not due my pension for another 2 years. My husband had been medically retired from his porters job at an NHS hospital. He receives no NHS pension because he worked for a contractor. I have a small pension. We have claimed Universal Credit as a couple recently we were given £248.00 for month. We are now downsizing in order to keep going to our OAP. I feel my life has been ruined by this thoughtless Government. I have 40 years insurance stamps and my hubby has 46 years.

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  36. To date I’ve paid 45 years of NI contributions but I must work another 3 years till I’m 66years old to qualify for a Full Government Pension – If I leave work now I won’t qualify for a Full Pension – I have health issues from working in NHS 42 years and lifting heavy patients over the years and now have musculoskeletal problems and I’m on Morphine to allow me to be able to continue to work!

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  37. It’s time this was sorted out. Women are desperate. We know it’s wrong. I’m sure Govt knows it’s wrong but they are prepared to wait till we reach new SPA or die. All parties are complicit. I’m sick of email and tweeting my MP Greg Clark who simply does not want to know.

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  38. This is how bad it is for me. I’ve had a friendship with Linda all my life. We shared a classroom all our school years. We worked in the same factory and at 64 were still going to the cricket match together.
    She was the oldest in my class I the youngest but we had worked the same number of years but she got her pensions this year I’ve got another 18 months to work before I get mine I’ll be nearly 66! I’m tired I work 4 days a week. I fall asleep in the chair with my shoes and coat still on my feet. I earn minimum wage and get no help from anywhere. Even when I had both my feet broken and reset I got no financial help I lived on 400 pounds a month and could not afford to pay for any help. I worked in social work for 23 years helping others and I’m tired. Please get my pension back I’m so tired please.

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  39. Thank you for this brilliant piece of sad fact. I hope all the media have a copy. 1950s women have undoubtedly been shafted by successive Governments and Guy Oppermans refusal to engage in any meaningful way says more about the disgraceful way we have been treated – running scared – I am praying for a result from the legal challenge as well as a result any day now from the Ombudsman from my cplaint so wholeheartedly supported by my SNP MP Angela Crawley who shares pension portfolio with Mhairi Black. The review in February 2019 will be the icing on the cake.

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  40. Thank you for having a bit of decency and talking up for women like myself who have been affected by this disgraceful parody we’re being treated very very badly indeed I hope and pray this all backfires in z government that quite literally dont give a damn about A about anyone but themselves…..I’ve worked all my life and to be treated like this in my senior years is tantamount to daylight bloody robbery……

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  41. I am one of those 1950s women. It wouldn’t be so bad if there were jobs for us but there are not – I lost my job in 2005 as the result of a misdiagnosed illness and have not had a permanent job since. There is not a level playing field in the UK jobs market, and I personally have been subjected to age discrimination and bullying. Feeling like a third-class citizen in my country of birth, I voted Leave in the referendum – how many women of my age group did the same thing for the same reasons?

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  42. I totally support this campaign. Born during February 1958 under the current rules my retirement age has jumped to age 66.
    I have worked from age 15 and had always believed I would retire aged 60. In fact it was only relatively recently I learned that this was not correct and by research and contacting the state pensions department did I uncover the actual age.
    I work as a social worker and the pace and concentration needed is utterly exhausting, I cannot see myself doing this for another 6 years!

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  43. I am a 1950’s born woman who has been denied a pension for 6 years without notice. I follow you, admire your writing and am grateful for your support. However I found this quoted ‘report/opinion’ difficult to understand because of the long sentences with no commas. Please can you advise me, who Jackie Jones is, and what makes her an expert? ‘Also, what/who is CEDAR? or should this read CEDAW?

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    • Ros, it should be CEDAW not CEDAR I thought I had ironed out the typos. I had not heard of this organisation either it is an international convention that countries who sign up agree to promote women’s rights and also agree not to disadvantage women by passing laws that are discriminatory. Professor Jackie Jones, a law professor, ( in later blogs I put a link to her page) is better known internationally for her work on this and also trafficking.Hope that helps – wording of these conventions is alwats a bit long winded and technical by the way.

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  44. I will be 65 in December ( still no pension ) I worked in a physical demanding job my body cannot take anymore I have now left . is this how the government and previous governments treat people in there old age I hope this injustice is sorted before its to late for all of us

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  45. I was born in 1955 and have NEVER received any notification of any changes to my state pension either 1997 or 2011, disgraceful.
    I have paid in full stamp since I was 17 and have 45 years paid In.
    When I started work women were not allowed to join a company pension, penalised all the way down the line.
    Well done and I wait to see the result of the court hearing.
    Julia Cornwell

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    • Julia Cornwell, I was born in 1957 and I haven’t received any notifications either. Now was I told that the amount of qualifying years had changed. I guess there are thousands of women out there in the same boat as us.

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  46. I was born in 1957.I took time off work to raise my 5 children 4 of whom pay towards the older generations pensions.l returned to work on very low income when my forth child was 3.Ilost my youngest son in 2006 and have suffered from depression and other illnesses since.I have not worked since but I started work at 15 years old and have accrued enough national insurance payments for a full pension.But this has been delayed until 2023.I was informed about this by a letter four months before I was sixty.

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  47. I am one of these 50s women who is absolutely furious that mainly male politicians think they can treat women with scant disregard. Guy Opperman in my view has no backbone and no integrity, he seems to think that if he refuses to deal with the issue it will go away. You would have thought the Esther McVey, the pensions minister would stand up for women but she too is turning a blind eye. Neither of these politicians has to worry about their pensions, therefore they cannot/will not take the issue onboard. What happened to decency, and advocating for the common man? After all they are supposed to be the peoples elected servants. Or am I just being naive?

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  48. Brilliant, David. Thank you so much for your continued support. It is very welcome. The Conservative government has treated women born in the 1950s with extreme contempt. They, and all the women who have to follow with increased state pension age, must vote Labour or else we will get yet another vile and uncaring Tory government who, above all, are so supercilious as to behave as if elder women, who have had far fewer opportunities in life than men, do not matter. That, in itself, is a potential cause of mental illness such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Thanks to you, and Jackie, for your efforts on our behalf.

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  49. Dear David thank you so much for your support and hard work… my situation is very much like all those above.. worked.. cared for elderly parents.. brought up children while working part time.. I was wondering if you might give any indication as to how long it will be before we know the outcome of the JR ? I read up on it and it says it can take up to 3 months ? will that be from 1st Oct when the courts reopen ? Or have I got this wrong ? many thanks

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  50. This is us a really excellent piece of information. Let’s hope common sense prevails and judgement us made to assist and help all us 1950 ladies
    Thank you for the work you are doing on our behalf

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  51. Having worked full time ALL of my working life, whilst simultaneously raising a family and keeping house (which in itself is also a full time job), I have spent the vast majority of that time believing that I would be entitled to my FULL state pension on reaching 60 years of age. However, as a women born in 1958, that ‘goal post’ has now been moved dramatically to 66 years! A HUGE increase! Since women in my age group were not given the opportunity to even attempt to make alternative provisions in order to enable them to retire at the lifelong expected age of 60 years old, I feel, as the majority of 50’s women do, that we have been cheated out of the pension which is rightfully ours, a pension that we have paid into all of our working lives with the expectation that we would be able to access it upon reaching 60 years of age and that the government has committed a GROSS act of theft against the contributions made by this particular age group!

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  52. Dear David Hencke, Unfortunately I cannot afford the taxi fare to the Hyde Park meeting on Oct 10 to listen to you in person, sorry. It already costs me over £40 in taxi fares to be able to get about in London on my mobility scooter, no access to London underground, to pay for just one return journey from the railway station to Parliament Square. This money is funded for me from GoFundMe appeal, to make possible.

    The discrimination against women by greater number on lower pay than men, and more women in low waged public sector jobs than men, has meant the flat rate new state pension (pension act 2014, came into law April 2016) is unequal.

    More women were opted out of SERPs, so their flat rate state pension is more often lower than men’s. Most women as against half of men do not get the full flat rate.

    Discrimination was hard wired into the National Insurance Fund, because more men were the best waged, who paid no worker National Insurance contributions above a low maximum threshold. Still today, mostly men only pay 2 per cent on all further wealth above that threshold.

    Meanwhile, more women were so low waged they gained nil National Insurance credits by the system of Lower Earnings Level.

    Each low paid / part time job is looked at separately re National Insurance credits / contributions levels, unlike income tax that lumps them altogether for basic tax allowance. That means women who had a couple of part time jobs could get nil NI credits from either job, despite all told working above the LEL in money.

    More women have nil state pension by the flat rate’s small print, meaning need 10 years NI record to get any state pension money, whereas law before was 12 months minimum.

    Do you get the feeling that governments of all persuasions, hate women, and hate women who are poor even more! Admin GREY SWANS would very much like to talk to you 5 minutes, please, if you are able to come to Parliament Square when the rest of the rally come from Hyde Park. Because Grey Swans is not campaigning into this Tory government, but into the next Labour one. Easy to spot – a large lady on a grey mobility scooter.

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    • Thanks for your comment. I hope to get to Parliament Square as well as the Hyde Park rally where I am speaking. I will look out for you – your points are very valid. If I can’t make it to Parliament happy to get in touch another time.

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      • Thank you for your much appreciated support for my comments. I am going to try and speak at the rally at Parliament Square, to introduce Grey Swans to the gathering. I think what I have to say will be important enough for you to hear. Because there is a lack of understanding between the political class, WASPI Ltd and the Labour party specifically. Grey Swans fills the gap other pension campaign groups cannot reach re Labour. The bookies have high odds for a 2nd early election and Labour winning. No-one is campaigning into Labour who is Labour leaning, in a Labour way of the brand of Labour that Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn is. Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell are not listening to Grey Swans. I’ll explain why, if I get the chance to speak. Will you help me get that chance? It would be worth your while as a journalist, who like drama, however quiet and peaceful and calm. Thank you. Admin GREY SWANS

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  53. I’m almost 100 per cent sure that when I started working full time in local government aged 16 (now 61) there was a pay scale for women and a higher pay scale for men. I feel I’ve been shafted at both ends of my working life.

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  54. David Hencke, unfortunately I’m unable to get to Hyde Park on 10th October, as we live in York now (used to live in London). My husband has advanced prostate cancer so we can’t go very far at the moment, but I will certainly be with you in spirit and thank you for your efforts. I am 61 and won’t get my state pension for another 5 years. I also won’t get the full amount because the qualifying years were increased to 35, without any notification, and I have 31, having spent quite a few years looking after children and elderly relatives. My husband will be 65 in January and will get his state pension, and his bus pass (another thing we 50s women are missing out on) in May next year – if he lives that long. I also found out recently that there is no widow’s pension anymore, so I won’t get any part of his state pension when he dies – but that’s another issue entirely!

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  55. Pingback: Exposed: The worldwide hypocritical stance by successive UK ministers on women’s rights and their pensions | David Hencke | Britain Isn't Eating!

  56. Thank you for all your support we grafted and we’re shafted worked hard all our lives looked after elderly parents grandchildren thought we were getting our pensions paid all or dues we have been treated disgracefully our government does not look after its pensioners men and women they are a disgrace

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  57. I am single woman who served in the armed forces in 1984 and armed forces women were specifically exempt by an act of parliament from getting equal rights under the 1970 equal pay act etc. I couldn’t join as a technician as I was a woman I had to join as semi skilled and have restricted career. Women and Men were on different rates of pay and contracts eg. Women on 9 year notice engagement contract men on 22 year contract with much better pay and pension benefits. Men getting full pension after 22 years service. I am still pursueing this with the goverment and have been for 15 years being pushed off all the time with different governments. It’s disgraceful open sex discrimination against women born in 1960’s who have always worked since 16 years of age full time and remained single. I have worked in several engineering industries but still had a restricted career path and lot lower earning power than my male colleagues across my working life. I always comforted myself that I could always get my state pension at 60. To then have the goverment put it up to 67 years is beyond words.

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    • I too am an ex military woman. All the foregoing comments ring true. I was married and deliberately didnt start a family as I would have had to Leave. My marriage broke up and my husband got a single woman pregnant. She had to leave and got compensation because she was kicked out. IF i had known i would have had a family. I was trying to do the sensible thing. I then as a childless single woman worked and saved all my life and consoled myself with my pension due at 60. When I found out aged 57.5 I will now be SPA 66 i feel robbed. Violated by successive governments. I want my pension. I am now 60!!! Chaining myself up at westmonster next stop.

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  58. As a follow up to my previous about military life. I looked after my beloved father for the last 6 years of his life until he died suddenly 2017 aged 85 and he was thoroughly disgusted about the way we 1950s women have been treated. He couldn’t understand why the Govt was trying to inflict equality on us when we were of a generation which had never had equality. If an elderly gentleman could understand the concept then why cannot our so called political leaders???

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