Have the security services succeeded in censoring the MPs report on the murder of Lee Rigby?

Lee Rigby; Pic courtesy of AP Press

Lee Rigby;
Pic courtesy of AP Press

Very shortly before Parliament rises for the recess the newly strengthened Intelligence and Security Committee will produce their report on the circumstances that led to the atrocious murder of Lee Rigby in Woolwich.

This report is very significant because it is the first to be completed where the MPs have had the powers to compel MI5 and MI6 to release all their information on the case.

Therefore it is not surprising as I have reported in Exaro  that the security services have hit back and  made robust demands for  redactions in what the MPs might have to say about their conduct.

We should be able to see how successful they have been if the report acknowledges where there have been redactions.

The soldier, a drummer in the Royal Fusiliers, was hacked to death in May last year in Woolwich, south-east London as he returned to his barracks. His killers, Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale, are understood to have been known to MI5 for several years.

Adebolajo’s relatives say that MI5 had even approached him in 2011 to become an agent after he was deported from Kenya. He is said to have rejected the approach.

I understand the row between the intelligence officials and parliamentarians is understood to centre on UK’s intelligence operations in Kenya. The officials say that the report contains too much detail of these operations.

What alarms me is that security services appear to be involved in a spin operation in the  mainstream media to cover up their failings by demanding new extra powers and even emergency legislation to allow them to read anyone’s website on the back of any informed criticism of their actions

Let me make it clear to any bored  security operative who might be reading this blog that I have not seen or read a word of the MPs report. But I am aware that there is a fierce battle going on- and while I respect the role of the security services in fighting terrorism to keep us safe – I don’t want to see a blanket removal of our civil liberties or our right to privacy.

 

8 thoughts on “Have the security services succeeded in censoring the MPs report on the murder of Lee Rigby?

  1. Reblogged this on Beastrabban’s Weblog and commented:
    Lobster has been complaining of these tactics by the intelligence agencies ever since it first began publication in the 1980s. Their failure is always accompanied by a demand for further powers and increased funding, and they have minimal accountability to parliament. It’s time they were reigned in and their effectiveness was properly examined.

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on Jay's Journal and commented:
    They will do anything to keep things away from us – evil lurking all the time . The government forget that we know about Lee Rigby and we know that they were already know to a bunch of idiots, called MI5 and MI6. These supposedly “dipsticks” can’t join in a dot to dot book, never mind figure out crimes…

    Like

  3. Pingback: Surveillance law wins cross-party support but critics claim stitch-upGuardian_News | Guardian_News

  4. I don’t quite follow the logic here. The security services knew about these characters but instead of focusing their resources on them they waste their resources spying on a multitude of innocuous individuals, and then when there is an atrocity because they were looking elsewhere demand more resources to spend on watching even more innocuous individuals. Give us more money because we are inefficient? Ever get the feeling we are being played for fools?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s